SIMPLY DRAWING.

Anne D'Alton's Artworks, illustrtation, Pencil drawing/

A simple drawing, highlighted by some soft colour wash in watercolour can be most effective: try it for yourself.

Dreams

Dreams

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RELAX, WITH A VERY LIGHT TOUCH.

Anne D'Alton's Artworks, Anne D'Alton's Artwprks, illustrtation

I watched a programme about a painting challenge yesterday and whilst I enjoyed the various ways with which each artist approached their subject, one thing I really noticed was the very tense way in which almost all of them held their drawing and painting (brushes and palette knives, etc.) implements.  In this illustration, note how the brush is barely held in the artist’s hand.  This takes time to master, but is well worth the effort.

Painting a portion of a painting.

Painting a portion of a painting.

LIGHT UP YOUR ARTWORK.

Anne D'Alton's Artworks, buildings, illustrtation, ink drawing

Adding touches of yellow, or soft orange hues, or letting the colour of the paper

Through the archway.

Through the archway.

or under surface come through, makes for a light filled artwork.

THE ARTIST AND THEIR PORTFOLIO

Anne D'Alton's Artworks, illustrtation, portrait, watercolour

It is useful to have a photographic record of the works of art you have for sale.   These can be A4 size, printed in colour on good quality photographic paper and placed into  clear plastic folders, with the artwork  visible on one side of the folder and details and the price of the work, on the other side.   Remember to have a copyright stamp on all your photographed artwork and that all the works bear your signature.

Keep a  notepad to hand for commission, etc., queries and contact numbers.    And, remember  to respond to these enquiries, Sometimes the most discreet queries come from the most important clients.

ADDING A LITTLE DRAMA TO YOUR ARTWORKS.

Anne D'Alton's Artworks, illustrtation, ink drawing, Line and wash, motoring artwork, watercolour

Certain types of illustrations, whether drawings or paintings, may need a little “extra” to add impact and/or movement to the subject matter.

In this instance I have used simple radiating lines and small circular shapes to indicate the speed and the action of this motorcyclist, the late and very great Northern Irish road-racer, Joey Dunlop.   The lifted front wheel is one indicator that the rider is moving at great speed, but the addition of the dust and stones being thrown up by the rear wheel, adds to that sense of speed and indeed danger of this particular sport.

Do not be tempted though,

Action illustration

Action illustration

to overdo these indicators of speed, etc., as it may even obscure the movement of the actual subject or subjects.

THE ART OF THE PEN

Anne D'Alton's Artworks, illustrtation, ink drawing, Line and wash, Nude

Usually, as in this drawing of a nude made on primed board, I work in black ink, but occasionally, I use sepia coloured ink pens – particularly in figurative illustrations.   It takes time to work in pen so give yourself time.   This drawing is available.

Young woman seated.

Young woman seated.

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BE BRAVE AND BOLD – YOUR ARTWORK WILL BENEFIT.

Anne D'Alton's Artworks, contemporary art, illustrtation

   This is a more or less accidental piece that I started on by flicking diluted masking fluid randomly onto a page onto a page.  Next, I painted in the background (leaving the masking fluid intact) with washes of bright washes of acrylic paints, to which I then added copious handfuls of salt.   When the background was fully dry, I rubbed off the masking fluid with the tips of my fingers, to see what was below.

 I saw that the splashes of masking fluid has left daisy like patterns all over the page, so I simply filled in the centres with an

A View of Daisies

A View of Daisies

appropriate yellow, plus some cadmium orange and voila…..”A View of Daisies”

ARTISTIC BOUNDARIES CAN BE STRETCHED.

Anne D'Alton's Artworks, canvas, charcoal, illustrtation, oil painting, painting, portrait

In this portrait of the fantastic British Actor, John Hurt,  instead of the conventional oil portrait, this painting shows only part of the face in colour and the rest in cartoon form.    The work has been illustrated using oil paints and charcoal on stretched canvas.

Oil

Oil “portrait ” of Actor, John Hurt.